Law enforcement Switch to Jiujitsu to Control Use of Power, Improve Mental and Actual physical Overall health | Healthiest Communities Well being Information

When Police Sgt. Josh Liedke places on his gi, the two-piece uniform worn in martial arts, for an hour of Brazilian jiujitsu sparring, he techniques a sort of mindfulness, or remaining existing in the minute.

“When you arrive here, you concentrate on absolutely nothing but the mat and your approach,” the 21-calendar year law enforcement veteran says, catching his breath right after various rounds of extreme rolling, arm bars, again usually takes and leg locks.

During that hour, Liedke doesn’t believe about his superior-strain task in a unit that combats drug and gang crime. He does not believe about the appears, smells and sights of violence and struggling.

“You just fork out focus to the moves,” he says. “And you also get a great work out in.”

Liedke, 42, with a trimmed beard and calm smile, serves in the Marietta Police Office, in a metropolis about 20 miles northwest of Atlanta. The section, with about 140 sworn officers, has garnered notice with an approach that builds Brazilian jiujitsu, or BJJ, into its coaching curriculum. It’s a need for all new hires and strongly inspired for veteran officers.

A most important argument: BJJ helps make improvements to officers’ physical and mental wellness, as perfectly as resilience. As a consequence, officers use lesser drive through an arrest. 3 a long time into the exertion, “our over-all use of drive is down,” suggests Maj. Jake King, who initiated the program. For the Ga agency, Brazilian jiujitsu has grow to be a de-escalation resource.

The notion is catching on. The Ga Peace Officer Specifications and Schooling Council, the state’s regulation enforcement certification company, just voted to shift ahead with approving the Marietta design as a law enforcement instruction plan for the full point out. Also, the Ga Legislature before long might take into consideration laws to fund jiujitsu for all law enforcement. Legislators somewhere else, like in Michigan, are pushing for related measures.

BJJ originated in Japan and took maintain as a self-defense activity in Brazil some 100 yrs ago. It typically makes use of grappling approaches based on leverage and body positioning. Some regulation enforcement agencies, like the police division in St. Paul, Minnesota, have employed elements of martial arts ahead of, but the dying of George Floyd in Minneapolis and other hugely publicized instances of officers employing extreme force have amplified demand from customers for law enforcement reform, which includes much less

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Idaho governor signs abortion ban modeled on Texas law | Wellness and Physical fitness

BOISE, Idaho (AP) — Idaho on Wednesday grew to become the to start with point out to enact a law modeled soon after a Texas statute banning abortions just after about six weeks of pregnancy and allowing for it to be enforced by lawsuits to steer clear of constitutional court docket troubles.

Republican Gov. Brad Minor signed into legislation the evaluate that enables men and women who would have been spouse and children associates to sue a physician who performs an abortion right after cardiac exercise is detected in an embryo. Nevertheless he mentioned he had considerations about regardless of whether the legislation was constitutional.

“I stand in solidarity with all Idahoans who look for to protect the life of preborn infants,” Small wrote in a letter to Lt. Gov. Janice McGeachin, who is also president of the Senate.

But he also noted: “While I aid the professional-lifetime policy in this laws, I worry the novel civil enforcement system will in brief buy be established both unconstitutional and unwise.”

The regulation in the conservative point out is scheduled to consider influence 30 days immediately after the signing, but courtroom challenges are predicted. Opponents connect with it unconstitutional, and take note that six months is prior to numerous women of all ages know they are pregnant.

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Highly developed technological know-how can detect a initially flutter of electric powered action inside cells in an embryo as early as six weeks. This flutter isn’t a beating coronary heart it is cardiac action that will at some point become a coronary heart. An embryo is termed a fetus following the eighth week of being pregnant, and the precise heart commences to variety involving the ninth and 12th weeks of being pregnant.

The legislation allows the father, grandparents, siblings, aunts and uncles of a “preborn child” to just about every sue an abortion supplier for a minimum amount of $20,000 in damages inside of 4 a long time following the abortion. Rapists can’t file a lawsuit beneath the regulation, but a rapist’s relations could.

“The vigilante aspect of this monthly bill is absurd,” reported Idaho Democratic Rep. Lauren Necochea. “Its impacts are cruel, and it is blatantly unconstitutional.”

A Prepared Parenthood official identified as the law unconstitutional and claimed the team was “committed to going to each individual size and discovering all our alternatives

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Appeals courtroom mulls arguments on South Carolina abortion law | Wellbeing and Health

COLUMBIA, S.C. (AP) — An appellate court heard arguments Thursday in Planned Parenthood’s legal obstacle to South Carolina’s new abortion regulation, with attorneys for the condition arguing the nonprofit does not have standing to deliver the scenario.

The nonprofit team, which instantly challenged the legislation following Republican Gov. Henry McMaster signed it previous yr, countered that it stood on lawful bedrock.

The “South Carolina Fetal Heartbeat and Safety from Abortion Act” is very similar to abortion restriction laws beforehand handed in a dozen states that turned tied up in the courts.

South Carolina’s legislation requires medical practitioners to perform ultrasounds to examine for fetal cardiac action, which can commonly be detected about 6 weeks into pregnancy. Once exercise is detected, the abortion can only be done if the pregnancy was triggered by rape or incest, or if the mother’s life is in threat.

At difficulty in the appeal is a decision by U.S. District Choose Mary Lewis to set the whole legislation on keep, with lawyers for the state arguing that it was incorrect to stall all pieces of the evaluate, instead than just the “heartbeat” provision.

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The bulk of the government’s digital argument before the 4th U.S. Circuit Courtroom of Appeals centered on its notion that Planned Parenthood does not have lawful standing to deliver the challenge on behalf of women who would most likely be prevented from obtaining abortions.

Symbolizing South Carolina, lawyer Christopher Mills claimed a potential mom could eventually choose to a sue a provider who didn’t abide by the law, a situation he mentioned would produce a dire conflict of curiosity.

“They don’t have 3rd-social gathering standing because they have a distinctive conflict of interest in attempting to deprive the females they supposedly characterize of statutory legal rights in opposition to them,” Mills said, of Prepared Parenthood. “There is no situation that sanctions third-get together standing in the confront of this sort of conflict of interest.”

Julie Murray, Planned Parenthood’s appellate advocate, argued that Supreme Court docket rulings guidance the team acting in its recent legal role.

“It is bedrock regulation that litigants have 3rd-occasion standing to challenge a statute that specifically restricts their routines,” Murray mentioned, citing a scenario in which the significant court experienced “directly tackled the third-occasion standing of abortion vendors … and uncovered that 3rd-occasion standing did apply.”

“We would urge

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New CA law takes aim at long wait times for mental health care : Shots

When Greta Christina heard that Kaiser Permanente mental health clinicians were staging a protest on Oct. 13, 2019, over long wait times for therapy, she made her own sign and showed up to support them. She’s had to wait up to six weeks between therapy appointments for her depression.

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Ingrid Nelson


When Greta Christina heard that Kaiser Permanente mental health clinicians were staging a protest on Oct. 13, 2019, over long wait times for therapy, she made her own sign and showed up to support them. She’s had to wait up to six weeks between therapy appointments for her depression.

Ingrid Nelson

When Greta Christina fell into a deep depression five years ago, she called up her therapist in San Francisco — someone she’d had a great connection with when she needed therapy in the past. And she was delighted to find out that he was now “in network” with her insurance company, meaning she wouldn’t have to pay out of pocket anymore to see him.

But her excitement was short-lived. Over time, Christina’s appointments with the therapist went from every two weeks, to every four weeks, to every five or six.

“To tell somebody with serious, chronic, disabling depression that they can only see their therapist every five or six weeks is like telling somebody with a broken leg that they can only see their physical therapist every five or six weeks,” she says. “It’s not enough. It’s not even close to enough.”

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Then, this summer, Christina was diagnosed with breast cancer. Everything related to her cancer care — her mammogram, biopsy, surgery appointments — happened promptly, like a “well-oiled machine,” she says, while her depression care stumbled along.

“It is a hot mess,” she says. “I need to be in therapy — I have cancer! And still nothing has changed.”

A new law signed by Gov. Gavin Newsom in October aims to fix this problem for Californians. Senate Bill 221, which passed the state Legislature with a nearly unanimous vote, requires health insurers across the state to reduce wait times for mental health care to no more than 10 business days. Six other states have similar laws limiting wait times, including Colorado, Maryland, and Texas.

Unequal access to behavioral health care is pervasive

Long waits for mental health treatment are a nationwide problem, with reports of patients waiting an average of

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Surprise medical bills are the target of a new law. Here’s how it works : Shots

The No Surprises Act is intended to stop surprise medical bills. It could also slow the growth of health insurance premiums.

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The No Surprises Act is intended to stop surprise medical bills. It could also slow the growth of health insurance premiums.

J. Scott Applewhite/AP

Patients are months away from not having to worry about most surprise medical bills — those extra costs that can amount to hundreds or thousands of dollars when people are unknowingly treated by an out-of-network doctor or hospital.

The No Surprises Act — which takes effect Jan. 1 — generally forbids insurers from dropping such bills on patients and, instead, requires health care providers and insurers to work out a deal between themselves.

Some observers have speculated that the law will have the unintended consequence of shifting costs and leading to higher insurance premiums.

Many policy experts told KHN that, in fact, the opposite may happen: It may slightly slow premium growth.

The reason, said Katie Keith, a research faculty member at the Center on Health Insurance Reforms at Georgetown University, is that a new rule released Sept. 30 by the Biden administration appears to “put a thumb on the scale” to discourage settlements at amounts higher than most insurers generally pay for in-network care.

That rule, which provides more details on the way such out of network disputes will be settled under the No Surprises Act, drew immediate opposition from hospital and physician groups. The American Medical Association called it “an undeserved gift to the insurance industry,” while the American College of Radiology said it “does not reflect real-world payment rates” and warned that relying on it so heavily “will cause large imaging cuts and reduce patient access to care.”

Such tough talk echoes comments made while Congress was hammering out the law.

Here’s how the law will work and how it might affect insurance premiums and the health care industry.

Sending unsettled bills to arbitration

The No Surprises Act takes aim at a common practice: large, unexpected “balance bills” being sent to insured patients for services such as emergency treatment at out-of-network hospitals or via air ambulance companies. Some patients get bills even after using in-network facilities because they receive care from a doctor there who has not signed on with an insurer’s network.

Patients were caught in the middle and liable for

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