Most current Jump ARCHES awards target on professional medical tech alternatives to deal with vexing overall health treatment worries

PEORIA, Sick. and URBANA, Ill., Jan. 20, 2022 /PRNewswire/ — 20 investigation assignments are sharing a bit additional than $1.4 million in funding via the Leap ARCHES investigate and development software to tackle a variety of vexing professional medical worries including neurological testing for small children and athletes (such as concussions), migraines, and worry among nurses enduring pandemic troubles at home and at function. The Soar ARCHES software is a partnership amongst OSF Healthcare and the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign (U of I), and the University of Illinois Faculty of Medicine in Peoria (UICOMP).

The funding supports research involving clinicians, engineers, and social researchers to quickly establish technologies and devices that could revolutionize medical coaching and wellbeing care delivery. A lot of of the awards stand for new tasks, while some will construct on earlier funded attempts.

“These assignments highlight locations where by OSF Healthcare and our partners are dedicated to generating advancements, together with: COVID-19 restoration, personalized medication, information stability, overall health literacy to underserved populations, assistance for all those providing bedside treatment, as nicely as enhancements in neurological diagnosis/therapy, in accordance to Dr. John Vozenilek, vice president/chief medical officer, OSF Innovation & Digital Wellbeing. He adds, “We know digitally related health and fitness devices, effective information analytics, and new innovative techniques give the guarantee of universal conventional treatment and health and fitness know-how for everyone we provide.”

“The grant awards replicate areas of incredible investigate accomplishment on the U of I campus at the intersection of engineering and medicine, which commenced at our pretty have Health Treatment Engineering Systems Heart,” explained T. Kesh Kesavadas, director of the Wellness Treatment Engineering Units Center at U of I Urbana-Champaign. “The Center has set up alone as a main innovator on campus where by scientists remedy problems confronted by real clinicians in healthcare facility options with technological innovation these kinds of as AI-primarily based intubation and IoT sensor-dependent masks.”

Meenakshy Aiyer, MD, interim regional dean of UICOMP stresses collaboration and innovation are the important to advancing healthcare. “These Bounce ARCHES grants showcase the enjoyable choices that exist when the finest and brightest minds from across disciplines unite for the increased great.”

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Surprise medical bills are the target of a new law. Here’s how it works : Shots

The No Surprises Act is intended to stop surprise medical bills. It could also slow the growth of health insurance premiums.

J. Scott Applewhite/AP


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J. Scott Applewhite/AP


The No Surprises Act is intended to stop surprise medical bills. It could also slow the growth of health insurance premiums.

J. Scott Applewhite/AP

Patients are months away from not having to worry about most surprise medical bills — those extra costs that can amount to hundreds or thousands of dollars when people are unknowingly treated by an out-of-network doctor or hospital.

The No Surprises Act — which takes effect Jan. 1 — generally forbids insurers from dropping such bills on patients and, instead, requires health care providers and insurers to work out a deal between themselves.

Some observers have speculated that the law will have the unintended consequence of shifting costs and leading to higher insurance premiums.

Many policy experts told KHN that, in fact, the opposite may happen: It may slightly slow premium growth.

The reason, said Katie Keith, a research faculty member at the Center on Health Insurance Reforms at Georgetown University, is that a new rule released Sept. 30 by the Biden administration appears to “put a thumb on the scale” to discourage settlements at amounts higher than most insurers generally pay for in-network care.

That rule, which provides more details on the way such out of network disputes will be settled under the No Surprises Act, drew immediate opposition from hospital and physician groups. The American Medical Association called it “an undeserved gift to the insurance industry,” while the American College of Radiology said it “does not reflect real-world payment rates” and warned that relying on it so heavily “will cause large imaging cuts and reduce patient access to care.”

Such tough talk echoes comments made while Congress was hammering out the law.

Here’s how the law will work and how it might affect insurance premiums and the health care industry.

Sending unsettled bills to arbitration

The No Surprises Act takes aim at a common practice: large, unexpected “balance bills” being sent to insured patients for services such as emergency treatment at out-of-network hospitals or via air ambulance companies. Some patients get bills even after using in-network facilities because they receive care from a doctor there who has not signed on with an insurer’s network.

Patients were caught in the middle and liable for

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