Post-Roe, some areas may lose OB/GYNs if medical students can’t get training

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When Andrea Soto was 10 years old, her family immigrated to Texas from Mexico. Her grandmother, who lived in Houston, had Alzheimer’s disease, and her parents wanted to be closer to help with her care.

Growing up, Soto often served as an interpreter between her family members and their doctors.

“I did the best I could,” she said, “but there were moments that were complicated, and it went over my head, and we just tried the best we could as a family.”

Today, Soto is a third-year medical student at the University of Texas Rio Grande Valley School of Medicine. She chose to study at UTRGV — located in South Texas along the border with Mexico — because of the opportunity to work with a Spanish-speaking immigrant population.

“I want to be that Brown doctor that a Brown little girl who is interpreting for their parents should have had,” she said.

Her goal is to establish a practice that will serve immigrant families like her own, with a specialty in either family medicine or obstetrics and gynecology. But as Soto prepares to apply for her residency after medical school, she’s giving priority to programs outside her home state.

That’s because, despite her desire to stay close to home, she’s concerned she won’t have access to the medical training she needs if she stays in Texas.

“I won’t get the abortion care training I need if I stay, and I’m not willing to sacrifice that,” Soto said.

In states where abortion is now illegal, medical students like Soto are reconsidering their choices, abandoning their original plans in favor of pursuing training in states where abortion is legal.

“It’s a difficult position to be put in,” said Jessica Flores, a second-year medical student at UTRGV, who comes from the small city of Portland in South Texas and has long dreamed of serving her community as a physician. Now that Texas has made performing an abortion a felony punishable by up to life in prison, she is rethinking her plans.

“Do I pursue my education in a state where I want to be ideally, but it’s going to potentially undercut me and not make me as prepared as a physician for my patients? Or do I leave?” Flores said.

1 in 3 American women have already lost abortion access. More restrictive laws are coming.

In a post-Roe

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Why Some Healthcare Workers Would Rather Lose Their Jobs Than Get Vaccinated

Carole Funk gets a flu shot most years and is up-to-date on all her other vaccines. She refuses to get the Covid-19 shot.

A nurse practitioner for nearly 10 years, she believes Covid-19 can kill—she knows people who have died. Still, she lost her job running an urgent-care clinic in Strasburg, Va., in September due to her refusal to vaccinate, and remains unmoved. “Getting fired is not enough for me to overcome my fear that the side effects or adverse events of these vaccines are grossly underreported,” Ms. Funk said.

Ms. Funk, 50 years old, is among more than 200 workers at Virginia and West Virginia-based Valley Health System who resigned or were fired over requirements that the company’s 6,200 employees be vaccinated. They belong to a group of people who have made up their minds that Covid-19 vaccines could harm their health or infringe on their liberties.

There’s no evidence of the kind of underreporting Ms. Funk cited, doctors and public-health experts say.

The fact that these holdouts are healthcare workers makes them one of the most confounding challenges for the vaccination drive. Around one-third of the eligible population in the U.S. remains unvaccinated against Covid-19. Some of the vaccine holdouts, health officials believe, will ultimately be persuaded to get the shot—the so-called movable middle. Others might never be persuaded. Their resistance and potential influence threaten public-health efforts to defeat the virus, say epidemiologists and other health experts.

Carole Funk, at home in Virginia, is a nurse practitioner who lost her job running an urgent-care clinic because she refuses to be vaccinated.

“We want to get the virus to a point where we can manage it,” said Ali Mokdad, professor of health metrics sciences at the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation at the University of Washington.

He estimates that 85% of the population will need to be vaccinated before that is the case, and even the relatively small percentage of people who are opposed to getting the vaccine could be a barrier to that, considering it isn’t known when children under the age of 5 will be eligible. Shots for those between 5 and 11 years old could be approved within the month.

Most healthcare workers are required by employers to get immunizations for other infectious diseases, such as measles, mumps, rubella and chickenpox. Why are some resisting the Covid-19 vaccine?

The Valley Health urgent-care clinic where Ms.

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