Rugby stars and entrepreneur unite to start Wales-extensive well being and conditioning app

Two superior profile Welsh rugby gamers and an entrepreneur have done a productive spherical of investment decision to help the relaunch of a fitness application that will revolutionise the way people today entry workout and leisure providers in Wales.

Fitap is an modern lookup system connecting health and fitness center homeowners, own trainers, athletics golf equipment and well being and health suppliers with individuals at the touch of a button.

Founded by Wales rugby union internationals Alex Cuthbert and Gareth Anscombe, in partnership with Welsh CEO and entrepreneur Dean Jones, the app is exceptional and will help end users to research for products and services in their spot, preserving time and money and offering possibilities they might hardly ever have arrive throughout right before.

Those who download Fitap – which is giving absolutely free promoting place to conditioning gurus until January 2023 – can set up a profile and recognize options tailored to their unique needs, geographical place, price range, and availability.

“For individuals offering fitness companies, specifically unbiased gyms and own education services, the costs of advertising and marketing and marketing is superior, and difficult to evaluate the return on expenditure. Fitap is an economical, measurable, and available option,” explained Dean.

“We are excited to share a lot more with people today in the coming months as this is a match-changer for the sector and are thankful to those people who have supported us on this journey considering the fact that our delicate start in 2020, notably the properly-regarded corporations and sporting stars who bought at the rear of our thriving fundraise just lately, increasing over £200,000.”

Alex and Gareth – vital customers of the Ospreys and Wales rugby union sides – echoed all those comments and consider Fitap will help build a a lot more active and engaged populace in Wales.

“At current there is no just one-distinct location for people to explore their well being and physical fitness solutions, so the application will fill that void,” stated Alex.

“Everybody is unique and that features wherever they are on their wellness and work out journey, so this will give them an simple-to-use alternate to scouring the online in the hope of finding a little something appropriate.

“We are passionate about helping many others to be match, content and nutritious, so it is amazing to be able to relaunch Fitap to the industry.”

Gareth added: “As effectively as bodily

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Transgender patients find health care on Rutgers student’s app

Imagine checking in for an appointment with your primary care doctor, and you notice your forms show the wrong gender marker. You might feel confused, hurt, question how well your doctor knows you or how to offer you proper care. 

Transgender, nonbinary and other gender diverse people fear instances like this when they seek health care, like a nurse calling their wrong name or receiving incorrect treatment because of their outdated gender marker. Finding providers who know how to treat non-cisgender people would be ideal, but that’s not a simple feat.

Typing key words for transgender-affirming care in a search engine calls up LGBTQ-specific providers. It’s more difficult to find everyday health care services, like dentists or primary care doctors, who respect and understand gender diverse patients.

Creators behind an upcoming app, TranZap, want to make that search simpler for gender diverse people seeking care. 

Gender-affirming providers are not only doctors who perform plastic surgeries or administer hormone replacement therapy. They’re doctors, nurses, front desk staff and everyone in a medical office who know how to respectfully care for gender diverse patients. 

Second year Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School student Taylor Chiang is beta testing TranZap, an app that allows transgender people to review healthcare providers as a way to help other trans people find medical professionals who respect their identities. Chiang developed the app concept and is pictured with their mentor, Dr. Gloria Bachmann, a professor of Obstetrics & Gynecology and Associate Dean for Women Health at Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School.

Some resources exist that help transgender people find plastic surgeons or endocrinologists who affirm people’s gender physically. Taylor Chiang, a second year student at Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School who came up with TranZap, wants people to find “gender-affirming [providers] to get regular old routine care.”

“A big barrier to health care is being afraid that you’re going to be discriminated against or not knowing information,” Chiang said. “Whether or not a primary care provider is gender-affirming, that information is lacking.”

Transgender people face a high risk of physical and mental health problems, but are “consistently and systemically underserved by the American medical system,” a Center for American Progress report reads. Some 62% of transgender respondents said they worried about being judged based on their sexual orientation or gender identity in health care settings, according to TransPop survey results.

Second year Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School student Taylor Chiang, not pictured, is beta testing TranZap, an app that allows transgender people to review healthcare providers as a way to help other trans people find medical professionals who respect their identities.

Chiang experienced uncomfortable conversations surrounding their identity in health care settings before. They typically searched for providers who accepted their insurance, or heard about affirming providers via word of mouth. Sometimes, they “risked” the provider lacking knowledge about caring for and talking to transgender and gay patients. 

They had connections to transgender people seeking similar care, but they wondered about gender diverse people who didn’t have that community, who struggled to find health care. That

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Medical student creates app for improving transgender individuals’ experience with health care

Rutgers is endorsing the beta launch of TranZap, a web-based application designed by a Rutgers medical student for the transgender community to leave reviews for health care providers, according to a press release.

Taylor Chiang, co-creator of TranZap and a second-year student at the Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, discussed their role in the project and what made them want to create this resource.

They said that as a transgender individual, they think many aspects of health care need improvement in terms of treating the transgender community.

“A lot of the time, trans folks do avoid health care because they are afraid of the barriers that they might face,” Chiang said. “Those barriers can include financial barriers like straight-up access to care, but also discrimination, harassment, trying to explain what it means to be transgender, microaggressions, things like that. I think a lot of those things are off-putting to trans folks in terms of just seeking everyday care.”

Their role has consisted of advertising, creating protocols, getting feedback and more while the co-founder, Eli Lucherini, a doctoral candidate at Princeton University, has been working on the web development and coding for the app, Chiang said.

When inquiring over social media about which aspects of health care need improvement to the transgender community, Chiang often heard from community members that they do not know where to get suitable referrals or find gender-affirming health care providers, they said.

To address these issues, the app contains two main features, which are the ability to leave a review of a health care provider one has recently seen and the ability to look up those reviews once they have been left in the app, Chiang said. People can also browse for a particular physician.

Chiang said they like to see the app as similar to Yelp, except for transgender people and specific to health care. They said the reviews that are left on TranZap cover the overall experience of transgender patients with certain health care providers and answer specific questions to crowdsource information in one place.

“Did this provider ask what your preferred name was? Did this provider ask what your pronouns were? Did they use the pronouns once they asked what those pronouns were?’” Chiang said. “Those are very easy yes or no questions — they either did it or they didn’t do it — and we had some other questions that people

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