Baylor School of Medication wins $48.5 million in COVID lawsuit

Baylor University of Medication won a $48.5 million award immediately after a Harris County jury uncovered that losses incurred by the health-related college in the early phases of the coronavirus pandemic should have been lined by its residence coverage.

The verdict arrives as companies of all sorts fight with insurers to protect losses incurred from lockdowns, social distancing restrictions and other disruptions as COVID-19 rapidly spread in 2020. In the circumstance of the Baylor Faculty of Medication, that professional medical college stayed continue to be open up to take care of clients, and produce exploration around solutions, vaccines and the virus, but incurred losses to obtain personal protecting devices, continually clear and disinfect amenities and equipment, and protect other amazing costs.

Baylor filed an coverage claim in April 2020 to get well its losses, but was denied. The medical faculty then sued underwriters at Lloyd’s Syndicate, a home insurance plan marketplace headquartered in London that insures substantial or abnormal threats.

The underwriters argued that the virus just can’t trigger assets harm for the reason that it can be wiped off with disinfectant and doesn’t bring about any tangible or structural modify. The legal professionals for the underwriters did not answer to requests for comment.

Baylor’s lawyers manufactured the case to the jury that the physical existence of the virus on Baylor’s property brought about the loss of income and the added charges incurred throughout the pandemic, explained Robert Corrigan Jr., senior vice president and basic counsel at Baylor College of Drugs.

“We have been equipped to do that mainly because the frequent comprehending of what reduction or destruction usually means involves much more than some structural alter to the property — it is anything at all that impairs the capacity to use the house or impairs the worth of the property,” Corrigan said. “The jury absolutely thought that the presence of the virus did induce the house to be much less functional, fewer usable, considerably less valuable.”

Providers have submitted countless numbers of statements associated to the pandemic less than property insurance policies policies that give business enterprise interruption coverage, but handful of have succeeded, claimed Murray Fogler, a trial lawyer for Baylor College or university of Medication. Baylor’s situation was the initially of its kind, to Fogler’s know-how, that

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The Lifelong Friendship behind Astonishing $100 Million Gift to BU’s Medical School | BU Today

Edward Avedisian (left) and Aram V. Chobanian (Hon.’06) at the celebration announcing the Aram V. Chobanian & Edward Avedisian School of Medicine on September 29, 2022. Photo by Jackie Ricciardi

Giving

Alumni clarinetist’s philanthropy and humility results in the BU Aram V. Chobanian & Edward Avedisian School of Medicine

Two Armenian families finding freedom in America.

Two boys growing up poor a few doors apart in hardscrabble Pawtucket, R.I.

Two successful men—one a renowned cardiologist and former president of Boston University, the other a celebrated clarinetist for the Boston Pops—changing the course of Boston University history.

Lifelong friends Aram V. Chobanian (Hon.’06) and Edward Avedisian (CFA’59,’61) will now be connected forever as the namesakes of BU’s medical school. Thanks to a $100 million gift from Avedisian that will support scholarships, endowed faculty chairs, and cutting-edge research and teaching, the school is being renamed the Boston University Aram V. Chobanian & Edward Avedisian School of Medicine

University President Robert A. Brown called it “one of the most remarkable grants in the history of higher education” at a private signing ceremony at his residence in late August to accept the gift and formalize the school’s name change. 

The gift was announced to the public on Thursday at the school, before invited guests under a tent on Talbot Green, where both men shared the podium with Brown, Ahmass Fakahany, BU Board of Trustees chair, and Karen Antman, dean of the medical school and provost of the Medical Campus. Avedisian received a standing ovation and cheers before the sign with the new name was unveiled.

“This is a historic day for the medical school and for Boston University,” Brown said. The gift “gives an extra tailwind and boost to our aspirations that will benefit so many,” Fakahany said.

Avedisian and Chobanian donned ballcaps and white medical coats emblazoned with the new name. “With this white coat, I’m ready to see patients,” Chobanian said to laughter.

Avedisian is retired after nearly four decades of playing the clarinet with the Boston Pops and the Boston Ballet Orchestra. But it was the stunning success of his personal investments that afforded him the opportunity to give back to others. He has never forgotten his parents’ hard work and sacrifice, or the emphasis they placed on education, and he became a generous philanthropist to both the United States and Armenia in his later years. “I felt very

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Alena Analeigh Wicker, 13, just got accepted to medical school

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Alena Analeigh Wicker is like other 13-year-olds in that she enjoys going to the movies, playing soccer, baking and hanging out with friends. But very much unlike other teenagers, she just got accepted to medical school.

“I’m still a normal 13-year-old,” said Alena, a student at both Arizona State University and Oakwood University, where she is simultaneously earning two separate undergraduate degrees in biological sciences. “I just have extremely good time management skills and I’m very disciplined.”

In May, Alena was offered a spot at the University of Alabama’s Heersink School of Medicine for 2024, as part of its Early Assurance Program — which offers early admission to applicants who meet specific requirements. Alena is more than 10 years younger than the average incoming medical student.

“What is age?” said Alena, who lives just outside Fort Worth and is completing most of her courses online. “You’re not too young to do anything. I feel like I have proven to myself that I can do anything that I put my heart and mind to.”

When Alena was 3 years old, her mother started noticing that she was far from a typical toddler.

“Alena was gifted,” said her mother, Daphne McQuarter. “It was just how she did things and how advanced she was. She was reading chapter books.”

One roommate is 85, the other is 27. Such arrangements are growing.

Learning new skills, Alena said, came easily to her, and once she started school, she was sometimes taunted for her scholastic talents.

“There was a little boy that bullied me, and he would tease me and call me ‘smarty pants,’” Alena recalled, adding that her mother decided to home-school her for several years after the bullying started.

In fifth grade, she switched back to traditional schooling, though she continued to take advanced high school-level courses at home, using a curriculum her mother created. During the pandemic, Alena decided to expand her course load even more.

For Alena, algebra was easy. Geometry was intuitive. Biology was a breeze.

“I was bored,” said Alena, who recently started using her middle name, Analeigh, as her surname. “The high school work was so easy for me that I ended up graduating from high school at 12 years old.”

Taking extra classes, Alena said, was more of a pleasure than a pain. She flew through Harper Lee’s “To Kill a Mockingbird” and

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U.S. Professional medical Schools’ School Even now Absence Diversity: Research | Health Information

By By Cara Murez HealthDay Reporter, HealthDay Reporter

(HealthDay)

THURSDAY, April 7, 2022 (HealthDay News) — U.S. clinical colleges are not retaining tempo with a nation that is much more racially and ethnically various just about every day, a new study reports.

The schools’ medical school and leadership are not as diverse as the communities close to them, even though there are some beneficial developments, according to the conclusions.

It is not more than enough to set range quotas, mentioned direct writer Dr. Sophia Kamran, an assistant professor of radiation oncology at Harvard Clinical University and a radiation oncologist at Massachusetts Common Most cancers Middle.

“We have to also focus on retention and progress,” she said in a medical center information release. “We have to have proof-centered initiatives that create inclusive environments that can support cultural transform.”

Kamran mentioned she was motivated to dig into the problem by her personal encounter as a Hispanic lady who was the initial individual in her family members to show up at school, then healthcare faculty.

“I didn’t have quite a few mentors, instructors or role types in medical drugs from a related qualifications as mine to assist information me,” she said.

The findings suggest the will need to recruit more underrepresented scientific school candidates and to discover means to support them all over the academic pipeline, Kamran stated.

For the analyze, her staff analyzed Association of American Healthcare Colleges’ knowledge for complete-time college associates in 18 clinical academic departments. The investigate interval spanned 1977 through 2019.

The scientists also zeroed in on facts for those groups thought of to be underrepresented in medicine (URM), together with Black persons and individuals who are Hispanic, Native Hawaiian or Pacific Islander, American Indian or native Alaskan.

The proportion of URMs rose, but modestly. Black persons and Hispanics even now characterize a little aspect of complete clinical school, the examine found. Representation of Black gentlemen in academic medicine has leveled off or dropped, significantly between scientific college and division heads, in accordance to the analyze. That pattern started about 10 a long time ago.

“This is an space in determined need of study, because we want to reverse these developments in buy to address the deficiency the Black management at all amounts of educational medicine,” Kamran reported.

At all college ranges, people who were Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander and American Indian/Native Alaskan accounted for much less than

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Proposed Kearney medical school to help rural health care

LINCOLN, Neb. (Nebraska Examiner) — If you want to increase the number of doctors, nurses and other health professionals in rural areas, you need to educate them in a rural area.

That was the message delivered Thursday by several advocates of a plan to create a rural medical school on the campus of the University of Nebraska at Kearney.

State Sen. Robert Hilkemann, who grew up on a Randolph area farm and worked as a podiatrist in Omaha, introduced a proposal to spend $60 million of the state’s $1.04 billion in federal American Rescue Plan Act funds for the University of Nebraska Medical Center Rural Health Complex.

UNMC, which is located in Omaha, has had a program at UNK since 2015 that trains nurses and allied health professionals such as physical therapists.

Legislative Bill 721 would combine $60 million in the federal recovery funds with $25 million in private or matching funds. It would expand UNK’s medical offerings to include programs in pharmacy, public health and respiratory therapy, as well as training family physicians.

A ‘severe crisis’

Doug Kristensen, UNK’s chancellor and a former state senator, said 80% to 85% of the graduates of the university’s current medical program start their careers in rural Nebraska.

“Nebraska’s rural communities face an increasingly severe crisis in maintaining access to health care for their residents,” Kristensen said.

Fourteen of the state’s 93 counties have no rural physicians, and 17 have no pharmacists, the Legislature’s Appropriations Committee was told Thursday.

Dr. Juliann Sebastian, dean of UNMC’s College of Nursing, said the pandemic has exacerbated the problem, with many workers in health fields burning out or retiring early. Twenty-one percent of the state’s nurses, she said, are approaching retirement age.

Dr. John Craig, a family physician in his hometown of Minden, said educating doctors and nurses in a rural setting like Kearney makes it more likely that they’ll practice in a rural area.

Train students in rural area

“Students can see themselves living and working in a rural area,” he said.

Hilkemann said he’s seen the opposite when working with medical interns at his Omaha podiatry office. Students from rural areas are less likely to move back to a small town once they’ve married or established connections in the big city, he said.

“It’s important that we train students where they want to practice,” he said.

Kearney State Sen. John Lowe said the new medical

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As healthcare staff leave profession, others rise through school | Special Sections

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