Stranded by the Pandemic, He Experienced Only Vacation Coverage. It Remaining Him With a $38,000 Bill.

Duy Hoa Tran, a retired Vietnamese schoolteacher, arrived in Los Angeles in February 2020 to visit his daughter and 2-thirty day period-previous grandson. Two weeks later, the door closed behind him. To stop the spread of covid-19, Vietnam shut its borders. No industrial flights would be authorized into the country for the up coming 18 months.

Tran’s daughter, An Tran, who has a doctorate in enterprise administration and teaches marketing at the University of La Verne in California, did what she assumed was essential to guarantee professional medical coverage for her then-65-12 months-previous father throughout the pandemic. But the only choice for a customer on a tourist visa was journey insurance plan. In early March 2020, An Tran located and bought a policy, for about $350 a month, from a business called Seven Corners.

She could possibly as nicely not have bothered.

The elder Tran had been remaining at An’s household in Diamond Bar, California, about a year when he instructed his daughter he was getting difficulty seeing out of his correct eye. A check out to an ophthalmologist produced a solemn verdict: Tran had significant glaucoma and would rapidly go blind until he obtained surgical treatment.

7 Corners gave published preapproval for the methods encouraged by Dr. Brian Chen. To be harmless, An Tran named the insurance company “many times” to confirm it would deal with the expense, but no one she spoke with would give her a definitive solution, she mentioned. Chen, on the other hand, confident An that insurance policy providers usually included the remedy, which was pretty plan.

On April 19, Tran underwent the 1st of a few eye surgeries to solve the glaucoma. The surgeries — the past was on July 19 — were being productive. And then on Aug. 5, 7 Corners despatched An Tran a denial of support letter.

The company’s policy excluded protection for any “preexisting condition,” by which it meant any situation “whether or not previously manifested, symptomatic, acknowledged, identified, treated or disclosed,” the letter mentioned.

An Tran and her father were on the hook for approximately $38,000 in clinical expenditures, whilst 7 Corners had preauthorized the surgical procedures and she had paid around $6,000 for the insurance plan in excess of the preceding year and a 50 percent.

Shortly after her father’s eye surgeries, An Tran, of Diamond Bar, California, uncovered out that journey insurance plan normally gives tiny safety
Read More.. Read More

Pandemic increases mortality risk for people with mental health issues

Share on Pinterest
The pandemic increased mortality rates in people with mental health issues compared with people without. JGI/Tom Grill/Getty Images
  • A study finds that people with mental health issues or intellectual disabilities have been far more likely to die during the pandemic than others.
  • More people in these groups have died of COVID-19 and other causes.
  • There are likely several reasons for this disparity.

According to a new study, people in the U.K. with mental health issues and intellectual disabilities were at about twice the risk of dying than people without those conditions before the COVID-19 pandemic.

The study suggests this difference has increased dramatically during the pandemic, with people with mental health conditions and intellectual disabilities experiencing much higher death rates.

The current study considered “excess deaths,” a general category of deaths during a particular period compared with historical levels.

Says the study’s lead author, Dr. Jayati Das-Munshi of King’s College London in the United Kingdom:

“The results from our study paint a stark picture of how the existing vulnerability of those with mental health conditions and intellectual disabilities has worsened during the COVID-19 pandemic. The higher death rates compared [with] the general population were associated with more deaths from [SARS-CoV-2] infection itself, as well as deaths from other causes.”

Dr. Thomas F. Betzler, executive clinical director of the Montefiore Behavioral Health Center in New York, who was not involved in the study, confirmed for Medical News Today that “many of our patients have similar issues.”

Dr. Das-Munshi says the study’s findings warrant a reappraisal of the groups understood to be at high risk of dying from COVID-19:

“People living with severe mental health conditions and intellectual disabilities should be considered a vulnerable group at risk of COVID-19 mortality — as well as deaths from other causes — throughout the pandemic. We suggest a need to prioritize vaccination and optimize physical healthcare and suicide risk reduction before, during, and after peaks of [SARS-CoV-2] infection in people living with mental health conditions.”

The study appears in The Lancet Regional Health Europe.

The study’s analysis found an increased likelihood of dying among people with mental health issues and intellectual disabilities in the U.K. during the first COVID-19 lockdown compared with the general population.

Specifically, they found that:

  • People with intellectual disabilities were 9.24 times more likely to die of COVID-19.
  • People with eating disorders were 4.81 times
Read More.. Read More

Health Department: Pandemic having devastating effects on the community | Local News

It’s here. It’s real. It’s not going anywhere soon.

Some 19 months in, the coronavirus pandemic continues to result in infections, hospitalizations and lives lost. At the center of the local response is the La Crosse County Health Department, and while they understand the community is tiring of masking and distancing, the have seen the devastation of COVID-19 firsthand, and they are urging residents to take the virus seriously.






Paula Silha


“It’s been 18 months of crazy and ‘when is is this going to end?’,” says Paula Silha, health education manager at the La Crosse County Health Department (LCHD) and COVID response testing lead. “This is a marathon, not a sprint.”






La Crosse County Health Department Director Audra Martine

Martine




Jacquie Cutts, nurse manager for the LCHD, says, “A lot of people are just pretending it’s not a thing anymore, and that’s just not true. And we’re concerned about how that will impact people, how it has impacted people and how it will continue to impact people. And there’s a balance there to be had. We have to find ways to live our lives. But there are ways that we can do that safely, and a lot of those ways are not being leveraged right now and there are consequences to that.

“So there are people who would be alive right now and aren’t. There are people that have really astronomically high medical bills that don’t need to have those. And what we’re trying to get across to people is the message that COVID is still with us for a while longer,” Cutts continues. “We need to to bring back some of those practices to protect people and that they should have a vested interest in doing that. So you can find a safer way to see your friends and family and recreate that doesn’t necessarily put put as many people at risk.”

People are also reading…






Jacquie Cutts

Jacquie Cutts


In late spring, the state experienced something of a reprieve from COVID with a dip in case rates and, from mid May to early August, no coronavirus deaths, Cutts says. For a while, the CDC relayed masks were no longer essential for the vaccinated. But the delta variant proved rapidly spreading and a catalyst for breakthrough infections, and masks for all were once again strongly urged.

In August, cases started trending up again in La Crosse County, with a 60-fold increase from July to mid-August through early October.

Read More.. Read More

The pandemic has driven many Americans to delay health care : Shots

Hospitals in Idaho, like St. Luke’s Boise Medical Center in Boise, remain full after the summer delta surge pushed many to their limits.

Kyle Green/AP


hide caption

toggle caption

Kyle Green/AP


Hospitals in Idaho, like St. Luke’s Boise Medical Center in Boise, remain full after the summer delta surge pushed many to their limits.

Kyle Green/AP

Last month, Chelsea Titus, a 40-year-old mother of one in Boise, Idaho, needed surgery to relieve severe pain from endometriosis. But hospitals there are so full of unvaccinated COVID-19 patients that doctors told her she’d have to wait.

Nearly 1 in 5 American households has had to delay care for serious illnesses in the past few months, according to a new poll from NPR, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health.

Titus, who works for a tech company from the home she shares with her husband, her daughter and a labradoodle named Winston, previously had surgery for endometriosis in which doctors removed her uterus and one ovary. When the condition flared again in September, the pain was severe.

“Sometimes it feels like I am in active labor,” she says.

Endometriosis affects millions of women in the U.S. when tissue that typically grows inside the uterus also grows outside it.

When the initial medication that Titus received didn’t help, she reached out to her on-call doctor.

“He said, ‘If the hospitals weren’t in the situation they were in, I would have you in for surgery today,’ ” she recalls.

The safety net is gone

The situation in Idaho’s hospitals has become dire. The facilities are so full of mostly unvaccinated COVID-19 patients that many can no longer operate normally. Several hospitals have had to ration care.

Chelsea Titus

Chelsea Titus/Boise State Public Radio


hide caption

toggle caption

Chelsea Titus/Boise State Public Radio


Chelsea Titus

Chelsea Titus/Boise State Public Radio

Jim Souza, chief physician executive at the largest of Boise’s hospitals, St. Luke’s, describes his institution’s typical high standards of care as the net that allows doctors to perform high-wire medical acts every day.

But now, “the net is gone and the people will fall from the wire,” Souza says.

Idaho has one of the lowest COVID-19 vaccination rates in the United States.

“As cancer clinicians, we’re really frustrated,” says Dr. Dan Zuckerman, medical director for St. Luke’s Cancer Institute.

Zuckerman says his staff has delayed surgery

Read More.. Read More