Dobbs case spurs race to teach abortion procedures in medical schools

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KNOXVILLE, Tenn. — As he aborted 11 pregnancies at a clinic here one busy Friday this month, Aaron Campbell also was training a medical student in a procedure that soon could be outlawed in this state and many others. Case by case, he narrated the nuances of pelvic examination, pain-blocking injection, cervical dilation and, ultimately, the removal of embryonic or fetal tissue.

Lindsey Gorman observed throughout and participated when appropriate, under Campbell’s guidance. With her hands she checked the size and tilt of the uterus. She also practiced ultrasound techniques and used speculums, swabs and local anesthetic to prepare patients. The student from Lake Erie College of Osteopathic Medicine in Pennsylvania was the seventh trainee to work with him in the past year, following medical residents from East Tennessee State University and the University of Tennessee’s teaching hospital in Knoxville.

Campbell and other abortion providers are racing to train the next wave of specialists in the field as the days tick toward a Supreme Court decision that could imperil the legal foundation of their practice and lead to upheaval across the country for education and training in reproductive health.

Barring a surprise ruling, a geographic split looms: Some states will provide full access to abortion training for medical residents and students. Some will have limited access. And some will have virtually no access without long-distance travel. That, in turn, could influence where many doctors, especially those focused on obstetrics and gynecology, choose to live and work.

The Supreme Court overturned federal abortion protections on June 24. Now, where abortions can be legally performed is limited to mostly Democratic states. (Video: The Washington Post, Photo: Sarah Silbiger/The Washington Post)

The leak of a draft court opinion in May showed that justices are poised to overturn the 1973 precedent Roe v. Wade, which would be a monumental victory for the antiabortion movement. If the court strikes down or narrows Roe, an array of medical institutions will face state scrutiny over how abortion is taught.

While abortion-rights advocates worry and wait, Campbell performs elective abortions for as many patients as he can at the Knoxville Center for Reproductive Health and trains as many medical students and residents as he can.

“We can pass as many laws as we want, for or against access,” Campbell said, “but at the end of the day, if you don’t have

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Health care trading network buys case support platform

Global Healthcare Exchange Inc. bought Explorer Surgical Corp. on undisclosed terms. GHX is a Louisville-based software-as-a-service company. Explorer Surgical operates a digital and remote case support platform and is based in Chicago.

GHX’s main offering is GHX Exchange, which connects health care providers and suppliers of goods and services via electronic platform, a back-office supply-chain and purchasing system and incorporating data and analytics globally, according to its website, news reports and a press release on the acquisition.

Explorer Surgical’s work also includes connecting suppliers with health care providers, including remote mentoring and performance-tracking tools. One offering lets hospitals “guide, track and analyze activity in the operating room, and improve communication and performance,” startup journal Chicago Inno said.

“Patient care decisions must be grounded in data, product expertise and procedural best practices because lives depend on it,” GHX president and CEO Bruce Johnson said in a press release announcing the deal.

“Healthcare is rife with inefficiency and must standardize the operational and clinical best practices and products that yield the best possible patient outcomes,” Explorer Surgical co-founder and CEO Jennifer Fried said.

Explorer Surgical had raised $11 million in funding through April, led by Aphelion Capital in California and Sofia Fund, a Minnesota group investing in technology companies run by women, Chicago Inno said.

The acquisition of Explorer Surgical follows GHX’s purchase of Lumere, founded as Procured Health in 2014 and focused on cutting health care costs with data and analytics, in January 2020. In 2018 it bought Medical Columbus AG, a cloud-based health care supply-chain manager.

GHX was founded in 2000 by industry suppliers including Medtronic Inc., Abbott Laboratories, GE Healthcare, Johnson & Johnson and Baxter International. Other owners joined through February 2014 a healthcare journal said, reporting its sale to private equity firm Thoma Bravo LLC.

The private equity firm at the time generally invested up to $300 million in its acquisitions. Additional acquisitions followed its buyout.

In May 2017, Singapore-based Temasek Holdings Ltd. bought most of Thoma Bravo’s stake. Thoma Bravo exited its investment fully in June 2021 when Warburg Pincus made a minority investment in GHX. PE Hub said the Pincus investment was $500 million.

GHX works with 5,600 health care providers and 950 suppliers in the U.S. and Europe, its website said. In the Warburg investment press release, GHX said its platform serves providers with 80% of licensed hospital beds in the U.S. and that 85%

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These 3 Health Tech Startups Are Case Studies – Crunchbase News

March 12, 2020, was always going to be memorable for Jason Feldman, because that was the day his men’s health-focused startup, Vault Health, was set for a major rebrand and national rollout. But now the day is etched in his mind because it set his company on an unexpected trajectory that led to growth beyond his expectations. 

On that mid-March Thursday, Feldman stood on the stock market floor in New York and witnessed the chaos as the country’s Dow Jones Industrial Average and S&P 500 saw the greatest single-day percentage dip since 1987. 

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The founder and CEO was there to pose for photos and provide an interview to announce Vault Health’s next moves, but instead found the market was reacting to the COVID-19 virus. The deadly coronavirus had been declared a pandemic by the World Health Organization the day before, and would be branded a national emergency in the United States by then-President Donald Trump less than 24 hours later. 

“I was there watching these investors on the floor of the stock exchange freaking out because the market literally was crashing,” Feldman remembered in a recent interview with Crunchbase News. “So we go back to the office, and I thought ‘What are we going to do?’ Because we had literally just launched the brand nine months before and built all this technology and here we are. Now I’m afraid that peoples’ jobs are at risk, and I don’t know how we’re going to live.” 

Vault not only lived, but grew significantly over the next year and a half. 

The pandemic set in motion a new trajectory for many healthtech startups, particularly those nimble enough to respond to a world crisis that confused and broke traditional public health care systems. And while tech’s contribution during the pandemic was a mixed bag of good and bad, those that figured out how to quickly fill the needs of scared residents, governments and companies have been rewarded. 

Investors in the space raced to put money into digital health startups last year. In all, the industry raised $16.6 billion in investments globally while the pandemic raged on, up from $12.5 billion the year before, according to Crunchbase data. So far in 2021, the industry has raised nearly $20 billion in funding, the data show. 

Of those that successfully made a pandemic pivot, many lucked out having existing partnerships

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